ZipRecruiter announced two partnerships, one to help job seekers earn credentials and share them with employers, and the other to help job seekers learn more about companies they might work for.

In the first instance, ZipRecruiter and Facebook said they’re making it easier for candidates to find their next job—as long as they’ve earned credentials through Facebook Blueprint, the social network’s learning platform for digital marketers.

The companies’ arrangement allows users to learn about Facebook’s digital certification programs in ZipRecruiter’s Course Catalog. Once they complete a course and receive their credential, job seekers can connect with employers through a new website, which is built on ZipRecruiter’s capabilities but carries Facebook’s brand.

Job seekers can also add credentials to their ZipRecruiter profile, then access additional opportunities through ZipRecruiter’s marketplace.

ZipRecruiter positions the arrangement as a way to address the changing dynamics of the labor market. “In the wake of the pandemic, Americans are turning from community colleges and universities toward more affordable online training programs, and employers are moving from degree-based hiring to a focus on skills and competencies,” said ZipRecruiter CEO Ian Siegel.

RippleMatch Recruiting at HBCUS

‘What’s It Like to Work Here?

Separately, ZipRecruiter announced a partnership with Comparably, a culture and compensation monitoring site. Under this integration, Comparably information such as reviews, salary data, information about culture, diversity and benefits will be presented on ZipRecruiter’s company pages.

CEO Jason Nazar said Comparably is “committed” to helping job seekers by providing “the most comprehensive and accurate look at what it’s like to work across tens of thousands of companies.”

Coincidently, Comparably recently bestowed its Best Career Growth award on ZipRecruiter. The Comparably Awards are based on employee sentiment ratings of CEOs and organizations.

“The number one reason people cite for wanting to switch jobs is that they feel they have no room to grow in their careers,” said Siegel. “Career growth potential is among the most important aspects of a job to employees, second only to salary.”


Authors
Mark Feffer

Mark Feffer is executive editor of RecruitingDaily and the HCM Technology Report. He’s written for TechTarget, HR Magazine, SHRM, Dice Insights, TLNT.com and TalentCulture, as well as Dow Jones, Bloomberg and Staffing Industry Analysts. He likes schnauzers, sailing and Kentucky-distilled beverages.


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